For developers

FAQ

What does GTFS stand for? The GTFS (General Transit Feed Specification) is an entirely public and free format developed originally by Google to enable the installation of public transport timetable databases into applications using geographical positions. How often does BKK upload a new database on its website? Timetables are usually finalised on a monthly basis, but if necessary BKK updates its database on a weekly basis, hence the exact time cannot be foreseen. Please check the date of the last database update here. Does BKK provide further help relating to the database? Unfortunately we do not have a sufficient amount of resources for this; however Google has published a detailed English documentation about this format. In case your questions remain unanswered, we recommend Google’s own forum for developers or the dedicated forum in Hungarian. What kinds of temporary changes (diverted routes) are included in the database? We do our best to make long-term and/or pre-planned modifications in the timetables public in the database. The modified transport services in place for weeks in the summer of 2011 on metro line M3 is a typical example, on the account of which the routes and timetables of several bus lines were modified temporarily in addition to the metro. Short-term and unexpected diversions are not displayed. Why are new stations shown with a delay on the maps? Changes made in names of streets, roads and boulevards or the new as well as the relocated stops are presented immediately in BKK’s GTFS dataset, however certain map service providers need weeks or months to indicate new points. Can BKK’s timetable data be downloaded on every mobile phone? Nowadays most smart phones have the appropriate operation system and the associated map-display capability. Data can be presented in two ways: passengers are able to plan their journeys with the basic functionality of the operation system or are able to download a separate application processing BKK’s data. BKK ensures competitive neutrality by making data public on its website. To whom can I turn in connection with false data provided by the application? BKK converts data directly from its inner system hence they can be considered a reference source. Should tiny errors occur, we correct them continuously. As far as we have experienced, the presumed or real reasons of errors are made owing to data modified by the developers or insufficient knowledge about the public transport network and the lack of checking. We cannot take responsibility for accuracy of applications made by external developers. We kindly ask you to turn to the developer of an application, in case you find an error in an application developed by a third party. What are the specialties of the Budapest public transport network? There are different specialties of the Budapest public transport network as well as of the timetables, which are practical to be taken into consideration during development, such as: Transport lines indicated with an “A” run on a shortened route of the main, longer route. Consequently, they have one common terminus but the other terminus of the “A” line is only a regular stop of the main line. Timetables of the “A” lines are adjusted to their main lines, hence on their common routes even frequencies apply, mostly in both directions. There are numerous lines running on “roundabout” or loop routes, which means that the line does not run on the same route between the two termini: a bus stop found along the route is designated as one terminus, e.g. the Rákoscsaba-újtelep terminus of bus 276E. When we plan the timetable, we take this specialty into account thus providing an even transport service in the “strong” direction: to even up the gaps in service time, an extra, non-official “terminus” is added on the route. Night timetables have been planned to provide connections by waiting, hence making travel and journey-planning predictable. The planned time for connections is typically two-three minutes, e.g. transfer connections at Astoria.

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